Tours and Programs

Go Behind the Scenes at Cranbrook 
with the Cranbrook Center for Collections and Research
Collections and Conservation Program Series
April through June 2014

From centuries-old books to masterworks of modern architecture, Cranbrook works hard to preserve the unique treasures that dot its campus. Join the Cranbrook Center for Collections and Research as we explore behind the scenes and learn how scholars and conservators protect and maintain Cranbrook's incredible collections. The programs will be introduced by Gregory Wittkopp, Director, Cranbrook Art Museum and Cranbrook Center for Collections and Research. 

The complete Behind the Scenes series (all five programs) is limited to 30 season subscribers and will be available through March 7. Tickets to individual programs (based on availability) will be available to the general public beginning on March 10. 

Five Program Series (available through March 7)
Cranbrook Members: $125
General Public: $150

Individual Program Tickets (available beginning March 10, based on availability)
Cranbrook Members: $30
General Public: $35

"Cranbrook Members" include the Center's Charter Patrons, members of Cranbrook House and Gardens, Cranbrook Art Museum, Cranbrook Institute of Science, and current students or graduates of Cranbrook Schools. 

For reservations and to arrange payment, or if you have any questions, please contact: Kim Larsen at 248-645-3319, or by email at klarsen@cranbrook.edu.

Note: Although all tickets must be purchased in advance and are non-refundable (no tickets will be sold at the individual events), tickets may be transferred by the purchaser to a family member or friend. If you need to do this, please call Kim Larsen so that she can make a note on the registration sheet. 

Rock of Ages: The Sanilac Petroglyphs
and Cranbrook Institute of Science 

Thursday, April 10, 7:00 p.m.
Cranbrook Institute of Science
Please meet at the Admission Desk of Cranbrook Institute of Science

Join Institute of Science Anthropology Coordinator and Museum Educator Cameron Wood, along with Stacy Tchorzynski and Dean Anderson, archeologists from the Michigan State Historic Preservation Office and the Department of Natural Resources, as they discuss the Sanilac Petroglyphs, Michigan's only known prehistoric rock carvings. After an illustrated lecture in the Institute's auditorium, which will be open to the public, Behind the Scenes subscribers will be invited to continue the conversation in the Institute's vault with an examination of the original drawings and plaster casts that were made by Institute scientists in the 1940s. 

Cleaning House:
Painting Conservation at Cranbrook House

Thursday, April 24, 7:00 p.m.
Cranbrook House
Please meet in the Entrance Hall of Cranbrook House

Filled with priceless artwork, Cranbrook House also was used as a home for decades. The objects and furnishings it contains naturally suffered damage from light, dirt, and smoke over the years of its use, and now it is the job of the Cranbrook House and Gardens Auxiliary and the Center for Collections and Research to protect the home and its contents. Join paintings conservator Kenneth Katz and the Center's collections fellow Shoshana Resnikoff as they provide insight into the history and conservation of some of Cranbrook House's most significant paintings. Featured works include paintings by Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot, Jacopo Robusti Tintoretto, and Sir Joshua Reynolds, among others. 

Precious Metals:
Bronze Sculpture on Cranbrook's Campus

Sunday, May 4, 2:00 p.m.
Cranbrook Academy of Art and Art Museum Campus
Please meet at the Admission Desk of Cranbrook Art Museum

As the home of the largest collection of Carl Mille's bronze sculptures outside of his native country Sweden, Cranbrook is understandably proud of its outdoor sculptures. But how do we care for these treasures? Join the Center's director Gregory Wittkopp and sculpture conservator Giorgio Gikas as they discuss the history of the sculptures (and a few of their myths) and demonstrate the effort involved in protecting these vulnerable works from the climate changes of the great oudoors.

Raise the Roof:
Historic Preservation at Kingswood

Sunday, May 18, 2:00 p.m.
Kingswood Campus
Please meet in the Green Lobby of Kingswood School 

Kingswood is not only one of Eliel Saarinen's architectural masterworks, but the school also is one of the gems of Cranbrook's campus. Over 80 years old, however, even this gem needs polishing every once in a while. Cranbrook architect Craig Hoernschemeyer will show the work that goes into maintaining this historic structure, from restoring the copper roof (the largest in North America!) to restoring the wrought-iron pedestrian gate. Hoernschemeyer will be joined by several of the architects and craftsmen that have worked on these projects, providing an intimate look into the hard work of keeping an architectural marvel in tip-top condition.

By the Book:
Preserving Cranbrook's Printed Treasures

Sunday, June 8, 2:00 p.m.
Cranbrook Academy of Art Library
Please meet at the Admission Desk of Cranbrook Art Museum

The Art Academy's library contains thousands of books, some of which date back all the way to the 15th century! Join library director Judy Dyki and book conservator Julia Miller as they examine historic books and discuss the complicated process of preserving these incredibly valuable resources for generations to come. Featured books will include the library's rare Kelmscott Chaucer, printed by William Morris in 1896 and purchased by Cranbrook founder George Gough Booth. 

 

A Day Away: Marshall Fredericks and Alden B. Dow
Saturday, May 10, 2014

What do sculptor Marshall M. Fredericks and architect Alden B. Dow have in common? A great deal more than you may think, which is why they both are the subject of the Cranbrook Center for Collections and Research's next Day Away Program.

Join the Center as we explore the legacies of these unique Michigan figures and uncover Cranbrook's connections along the way. We'll learn about Marshall Fredericks' formative time at the Cranbrook Academy of Art as well as Alden Dow's evolving relationship with Eliel Saarinen. Good friends and collaborators, Fredericks and Dow were important figures in Michigan's art and architecture scene at the midcentury mark. Get an up-close and personal look at their lives and careers on the Day Away! 

The day starts with coffee at Cranbrook Art Museum before the group boards the Metro Cars bus for Saginaw Valley State University. At SVSU we'll visit the Marshall M. Fredericks Sculpture Museum, tour the collection with executive director Marilyn Wheaton, and get an exciting look at the museum's brand new sculpture garden (which opens in May). Following the in-depth tour, we'll travel to Midland for a delicious lunch at Cafe Zinc in the glamorous H Hotel, and then a tour of the Alden B. Dow Home and Studio. A National Historic Landmark, the Dow house showcases Dow's unique take on midcentury modern design and serves as a fascinating example of what qualities architects value when they design a home for themselves. 

Our guides for the day will be Gregory Wittkopp, Director of Cranbrook Art Museum and the Center for Collections and Research, and Shoshana Resnikoff, the Center's Collections Fellow and curator of A Driving Force: Cranbrook and the Car. 

Schedule for A Day Away: Marshall Fredericks and Alden B. Dow

Park in Cranbrook Art Museum's Main Parking Lot
Tour Check-in is at the Art Museum's Front Desk (248-645-3320)

8:45 - 9:15 Attendees arrive at Cranbrook Art Museum
9:15 Bus leaves Cranbrook (sharp!)
11:00 Arrive at Saginaw Valley State University
11:00 - 12:30 Tour of the Marshall M. Fredericks Sculpture Museum and new Sculpture Garden
12:30 - 1:00 Drive to Downtown Midland
1:00 - 2:00 Lunch at Cafe Zinc, The H Hotel
2:00 Depart Cafe Zinc
2:15 - 3:45 Tour Alden B. Dow Home and Studio, Midland, Michigan
3:45 Depart Dow Home and Studio
5:30/5:45 Arrive at Cranbrook Art Museum

Cost is $75 for Cranbrook Members (as noted below) and $85 for the general public. This event is limited to 45 guests so early registration is encouraged! 

Member rate applies to the following groups:
Center for Collections and Research Charter Patrons
Cranbrook Art Museum Members
Cranbrook House and Gardens Auxiliary Members
Cranbrook Institute of Science Members
Cranbrook Schools 21st Century Club Members

For information and reservations, please call: Kim Larsen at 248-645-3319.

The registration fee includes lunch at Cafe Zinc and admission to both the Marshall M. Fredericks Sculpture Museum and the Alden B. Dow Home and Studio. Program participants are encouraged to wear comfortable shoes and dress for the weather.

This event is organized by the Cranbrook Center for Collections and Research. The proceeds of this event support the programs and activities of the Center. 

 

Quite the Pet of Cranbrook: James Scripps Booth and the Early Car

Sunday, January 26, 4 p.m.  Desalle Auditorium, Cranbrook art Museum

Shoshanna Resnikoff-Collections Fellow, Cranbrook Center for Collections and Research

Explore the history of James Scripps Booth, the son of Cranbrook founders George and Ellen Booth, and his early automotive designs.  From cyclecars that he tested out on the hills of Cranbrook to light, luxurious vehicles for Detroit’s young movers-and-shakers, Booth played an important role in the history of the automobile. Explore Booth’s innovations, which include the rear-mounted spare tire and electric doors, and learn how his designs still impact the way we drive today. This lecture is included with regular Museum admission, and free to ArtMembers and students with identification.

Sponsored by the Cranbrook Art Museum

 

Training the Hand: Cranbrook Academy of Art and the Automobile Industry

Wednesday, March 5, 10 a.m.

Leslie Harcourt Green Communiy Room, Bloomfield Township Public Library

Shoshanna Resnikoff-Collections Fellow, Cranbrook Center for Collections and Research

The Cranbrook Center for Collections and Research goes on the road to the Bloomfield Township Public Library for an in-depth look at Cranbrook Academy of Art in the postwar period. This lecture explores the contributions that CAA students and graduates made to Detroit’s automotive industry. Graduates such as Peggy Sauer and Suzanne Vanderbilt represented the first prominent wave of women automotive designers, while Detroit’s car companies reached out to Cranbrook as a center of dynamic design in the post-war period. From partnerships with Packard Motor Company to the design of the Mustang, Cranbrook Academy of Art helped to shape the look and feel of the modern American car. This lecture is free.

Bloomfield Township Public Library is located at 1099 Lone Pine Road in Bloomfield Township.  More information at www.btpl.org

Sponsored by the Cranbrook Art Museum

 

Shoshana Resnikoff is the Collections Fellow for the Cranbrook Center for Collections and Research and the curator of the exhibition A Driving Force: Cranbrook and the Car. A native of Northern California, she graduated in 2012 with her MA in American Material Culture from the Winterthur Program in American Material Culture at the University of Delaware. She has worked at the Chicago History Museum and the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and received her BA from Emory University.

 

THIS EVENT IS SOLD OUT

Drive Deep with the Center into Cranbrook's Automotive History! 

A Day Away: Connecting Cranbook and the Car with Detroit

General Motors Heritage Center and the Ford Piquette Avenue Plant

Just added! A Tour of Henry and Clara Ford's Edison Avenue Home  

Saturday, November 9, 2013, 9:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Cranbrook Center for Collections and Research presents our second “Day Away,” a program that explores Cranbrook connections off campus.  Join us on this guided bus tour as we drive deep into Detroit’s automotive history, uncovering the hidden stories and characters that connect Cranbrook to the car. Building on the exhibition A Driving Force: Cranbrook and the Car (currently on view at Cranbrook Art Museum), Day Away participants will traverse miles and decades in pursuit of Cranbrook’s automotive past.

The day will begin at the Art Museum where we will have coffee and an overview of A Driving Force with the exhibition’s curator and examine in detail the Scripps-Booth 1914 Rocket cycle-car.  Our next stop will be the General Motors Heritage Center where, in one enormous space, the history of General Motors is told through the presence of approximately 600 cars and trucks. Concept cars and special-interest styling/performance one-offs are part of the mix, along with significant race cars and milestone production vehicles.  We will pay special attention to the cars that have a Cranbrook connection, including some outstanding Chevrolets (remember Louis Chevrolet once worked with James Scripps Booth) and a ’59 El Camino with interiors by Harley Earl’s Damsels of Design (remember two of the “damsels” studied at Cranbrook Academy of Art).

We then travel back into time to the birthplace of the Model T, Henry Ford’s Piquette Avenue Plant in Detroit.  Built in 1904 (the same year the Booth’s founded Cranbrook) and designed by Smith Hinchman and Grylls (out of which evolved The SmithGroupJJR, the firm that designed the Art Museum’s new Collections Wing), the “T-Plex” is the only example of an early Detroit auto factory open to visitors.  We will learn about the Model T and see dozens of vintage examples of these "Tin Lizzies" and the other Piquette Plant-era Fords.  It is in the midst of this time capsule that we will have a private lunch, catered by the already legendary Slows To Go in Detroit.

We follow up the Piquette Avenue Plant with a once-in-a-lifetime chance to tour Henry and Clara Ford’s Edison Avenue home in Detroit.  The Ford family built the house in 1908 and lived there until 1915, when they moved to Fair Lane in Dearborn.  Seven years was long enough for the couple to build son Edsel a machine shop above the garage—a remarkable reflection of James Scripps Booth’s own experiences in the Cranbrook House Garage in the same period.

Our day will end where it began, on the Peristyle of Cranbrook Art Museum where we will be greeted by Tom Booth (great-grandson of George and Ellen Booth and grandson of automobile designer James Scripps Booth) and his meticulously restored 1916 Model C Roadster.

Our guides for the day will be Gregory Wittkopp, Director of Cranbrook Art Museum and the Center for Collections and Research, and Shoshana Resnikoff, the Center’s Collections Fellow and curator of A Driving Force: Cranbrook and the Car.

Schedule for A Day Away: Connecting Cranbrook and the Car with Detroit

Park in the Art Museum’s Main Parking Lot

Tour Check-in is at the Art Museum’s Front Desk (248-645-3320)

8:45 – 9:15 a.m.      Coffee in the Art Museum

9:15 – 9:30 a.m.       A Driving Force: Cranbrook and the Car

                                Exhibition Overview with Shoshana Resnikoff

9:30 a.m.                 Board Bus for Sterling Heights and the General Motors

                                Heritage Center (Board the Bus at the Orpheus Fountain)

10:15 – 11:30 a.m.  Guided Tour of the General Motors Heritage Center

11:30 a.m.               Board Bus for Detroit and the Ford Piquette Avenue Plant

12:15 – 1:00 p.m.    Private Lunch at the Ford Piquette Avenue Plant Lunch

1:00 – 2:15 p.m.      Guided Tour of the Ford Piquette Avenue Plant

2:15 p.m.                Board Bus to Fords' Edison Avenue Home

2:30 - 3:15 p.m.     Tour of Henry and Clara Ford's Edison Avenue Home

3:13 p.m.                Board bus for Cranbrook

3:45 – 4:30 p.m.     Cider and Donuts on the Peristyle

                               Private Viewing of The Scripps-Booth Model C Roadster with Tom Booth

 

Cost is $75 for Cranbrook Members (as noted below) and $85 for the general public.

This event is limited to 40 guests so early registration is encouraged!

Member rate applies to the following groups:

Center for Collections and Research Charter Patrons, Cranbrook Art Museum Art Members, Cranbrook House and Gardens, Auxiliary Members, Cranbrook Institute of Science Members, Cranbrook Schools 21st Century Club Members.

THIS EVENT IS SOLD OUT.

Due to space limitations, prepaid reservations are required. The registration fee includes the catered lunch and admission to both the General Motors Heritage Center and the Ford Piquette Avenue Plant.  Program participants are encouraged to wear comfortable shoes and dress for the weather.  Please note that the Ford Piquette Avenue Plant is an unheated loft.

This event is organized by the Cranbrook Center for Collections and Research in Collaboration with Cranbrook Schools and Cranbrook Art Museum.  The proceeds of this event support the programs and activities of the Center.

 

 

 

 

FROM THE ARCHIVES: FORGING CRANBROOK’S GATESCAPE EXHIBITION and TOUR

Exhibition Dates: October 5, 2013, through March 16, 2014

Campus Walking and Bus Tour: Saturday, October 5, 2013, 1:00 – 3:00 p.m.

Exhibition:

Throughout its 108-year history, Cranbrook has had a rich history of gate design and fabrication, beginning with George Booth’s 19th-century work as a designer for Barnum Wire & Iron Works in Windsor, Ontario.  From peripheral entrance gates to interior ornamental gates executed in wood, wrought iron, cast iron, and even steel, and styles that include not only exemplary examples of the Arts and Crafts Movement but also incorporate cutting-edge 21st-century technology, over 80 gates have been installed on the campus.  These gates—Cranbrook’s “gatescape”—are the focus of the second exhibition in the From the Archives series.  

Forging Cranbrook’s Gatescape presents the historical and contemporary uses of gates, and explores the relationship between designer and fabricator, and ornamentation and the architectural landscape.  Photographs, architectural drawings, and documents—all drawn from the rich resources of Cranbrook Archives—illustrate the way in which the gates of Cranbrook define space and create a visual bridge between the visitor and the architecture.

From the Archives: Forging Cranbrook’s Gatescape was organized by the Cranbrook Center for Collections and Research and curated by Head Archivist Leslie S. Edwards.  The Center, which includes Cranbrook Archives, is supported, in part, by its Charter Patrons, the Towbes Foundation of Santa Barbara, California, and the Fred A. and Barbara M. Erb Family Foundation.

Walking and Bus Tour:

The staff of Cranbrook Archives, led by Head Archivist Leslie S. Edwards, has spent several years surveying the landscape of gates at Cranbrook.  During this walking and bus tour, Leslie will lead you to many of her personal favorites—which may be “new discoveries” for even the most seasoned Cranbrook visitors—including gates designed by George Booth, Eliel Saarinen, and former Academy of Art Designer-in-Residence Ted Luderowski.  From the earliest gates in 1905 to the most recent gate installed in 2013, the tour will offer insight into the historical significance of Cranbrook’s continued fascination with gate design and fabrication.

Tour Date:  Saturday, October 5, 2013

Time:  1:00 – 3:00 p.m.

Cost:  $30 for Members; and $35 for Non-members (Members for this tour include Center Patrons as well as members of Cranbrook Art Museum, Cranbrook Institute of Science, Cranbrook House and Gardens Auxiliary, and the Cranbrook Schools 21st Century Club.)

Parking Location: Cranbrook Art Museum Main Parking Lot

Tour Check-in and Departure Point:  Cranbrook Art Museum Front Desk

Note:  This tour will take place rain or shine.  Please wear comfortable walking shoes and bring an umbrella.

Registration:  Please call Kim Larsen at 248-645-3319 for more information or to register for the tour.  Attendance is limited to 30 people; advance registration and payment is required.